Greetings from the North of England


Hallo Guv’nah,

The meetings have gone well. After much discussion and deliberation among the sales team, we have come to the conclusion that profit is good. We have also agreed that more profit would be even better. Regarding our product design and manufacturing, we have also reached a consensus that quality and service are good things to provide our customers. Whew, that was tiring! Time for some more beer.

Well, not yet. We wrapped up around 5pm so I decided to go for a run and check out the neighborhood. I am in Worsley Park, on the outskirts of Manchester. It is really quite pretty here. The hotel is attached to a Country Club, and surrounded by the golf course. If I were a golfer, this would be heaven. Alas, to me it’s just a pretty park that they won’t let you play in.

Worlsey Park Golf Course

Worlsey Park Golf Course

So instead I went for a run down the road into the village of Worsley. There is a lovely little canal running through it, and the towpath made for a nice run. I did a little research on the history of the canal, and discovered that it is quite historic.

Canal boats on the Bridgewater Canal in Worsley

Canal boats on the Bridgewater Canal in Worsley

In fact, the Bridgewater Canal is the first true canal built in England. It opened in 1761 as a private canal, and is still privately owned. It was built by 3rd Duke of Bridgewater, to help transport coal from his mines in the area to Manchester. Part of the canal even went underground, into the mine. There were 46 miles of underground canal in the mines, which still exist, albeit locked away behind bars. The coal was loaded into narrow boats, and floated through the mines. I’m not sure how they got the boats to the surface, and transfered the coal above ground. Wikipedia is scant on the details.

The Packet House at Worsley

The Packet House at Worsley

As you can see in the pictures, the water in the canal is bright orange, the result of iron oxide leaching out of the old mines. Just another legacy of the environmental damage of the industrial revolution. It is amazing to think of the amount of coal that was pulled out of the ground here, and shipped by barge to fuel the rise of the British Empire in the 1700’s and 1800’s. This coal stained the countryside, and lungs of entire generations in the North of England, and created the fire for the steam engines that fueled the Industrial Revolution. And now it’s a private waterway for rich folks to boat on. Makes me wonder what Minnesota is going to look like in 200 years. What prized cutting edge technology will become a quaint object of leisure for the rich folks of 2209?

Canal at the Golden Hour

Canal at the Golden Hour

OK Class, that’s enough of a history lesson for today. Time to get cleaned up for dinner. And remember, if you don’t eat your meat, you can’t have any pudding. How can you have any pudding, if you don’t eat your meat?

Harry? Harry Potter?

Harry? Harry Potter?

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